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CULTIVATING ALLYSHIP

MORE COMING IN 2022...

The London Arts Council is committed to confronting systemic racism and inequity that exists in London today. LAC works with many artists/creators from Indigenous, Black and People of Colour communities in support of equity, justice and human rights. 

Allyship:

 

  • allyship is not an identity—it is a lifelong process of building relationships based on trust, consistency, and accountability with individuals and/or groups of people.
     

  • allyship is not self-defined—our work and our efforts must be recognized by the people we seek to ally ourselves with

    • it is important to be intentional in how we frame the work we do

 

This definition of allyship is informed by: https://theantioppressionnetwork.com/allyship/

Our continuing role:

 

LAC continues to promote and exercise the principles of equity in all that we do by amplifying the voices of those who are continuously marginalized and silenced.​  

The first phase of Sharing Circles  (Listening Sessions) are now complete. The LAC is reviewing the feedback collected through the sessions and will use the feedback to further develop programs, projects and services that best support IBPOC artists working and living in London and surrounding area.

 

RAISING VOICES

Cultural expression and production are powerful forces that can change the attitudes and beliefs of a society. The London Arts Council has worked with many BIPOC artists whose art serves to educate and build community.  We invite you to learn more about some of the IBPOC artists and arts organizations working with and receiving funding from the LAC's various programs and projects throughout our website.

London Arts Live 2020

London Arts Live 2020

Pride Lit - 2 Willow Switch

Pride Lit - 2 Willow Switch

London Korean Samulnori Drumming Team - Culture Days 2018

London Korean Samulnori Drumming Team - Culture Days 2018

Jim Han

Jim Han

Jim Han has worked in many of LAC's programs. In 2018, Jim curated B13 - one of LAC's Culture Days sites.

Youth Artist Mentorship Project

Youth Artist Mentorship Project

PL - River TalksArtist Shawna Redskye

PL - River TalksArtist Shawna Redskye

Connor McPhail

Connor McPhail

LAL2020q_edited

LAL2020q_edited

London Arts Live Artist Activation

Frank Reynoso

Frank Reynoso

London Arts Live Artist - Summer 2020

Global Girl Media featured at Public Art

Global Girl Media featured at Public Art

LAL2020d

LAL2020d

Amanda Myers, Crossings

Amanda Myers, Crossings

Richard Gracious

Richard Gracious

Christine Leu and Alan Webb public art p

Christine Leu and Alan Webb public art p

Residential School Survivors Public Art Project

Residential School Survivors Public Art Project

Quinn Smallboy, Visual Artist

Quinn Smallboy, Visual Artist

Moses Lunham

Moses Lunham

Residential School Project

Residential School Project

Megan Arnold & Vidya Natarajan

Megan Arnold & Vidya Natarajan

The London Arts Council is located within the traditional territory of the Anishinaabeg, Lenaapewuk, and Haudenosaunee Nations; land that is also shared by Metis, Inuit, and urban Indigenous community members. The City of London is party to the London Township Treaty of 1796 and the Longwoods Treaty of 1819.  

 

Pre-Confederation Wampum Agreements document longstanding covenants that bind Indigenous Nations to each other through the Dish With One Spoon Wampum (G’doo-Naaganinaa) and to settler-colonists by way of Kaswentha (The Two Row Wampum).

 

The London Arts Council acknowledges the 94 Calls to Action outlined in the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and recognizes that accountability to Truth and Reconciliation is sustainable and measurable over time.  Therefore, we are committed to inclusive and equitable arts programming that promotes Indigenous representation in program design and opportunities, professional development for Indigenous artists, and ongoing relationship building with the local Indigenous community.